In our first installment of our Sports and Character series we discussed life lessons that can be learned while enjoying the playing of the game. One of the lessons that comes through in competitive sports is self-esteem.

We have covered a few ways to build confidence, but there are still dozens of ways your young athlete is working towards a positive self-esteem. Below are three areas that also help increase the confidence of your young athlete.

Letting Go

Winning a competition is a great feeling, but it is not the main objective for the young athlete. The main objective is personal improvement. Working toward a personal best is a way to bring confidence to the forefront. A loss of a game is not “losing” if your athlete gave their best.

Understanding how to work through disappointment is a crucial step in building confidence. When your athlete can let go of the disappointment, they can clearly see where they excelled and what areas need work without seeing the loss as a reflection of their self-worth.

Respecting Interaction

Your athlete has the last word in how much effort they put into practice and games. Attending practices and games and keeping a good relationship with mentors and teammates are important parts of building confidence.

It is always a parent’s hope that the adults and other athletes around them will be respectful. However, not all young players’ interactions may include respect and other players may not be as mature in their behaviors. Guiding your child to show respect for the game, the rules and others – even when others are frustrating your athlete – leads to a self-respect that can be easily seen.

Visualize Self Worth

Sports and Character Series: 3 Ways of Building Self Esteem Visualization is not just one of the keys to a great game – it can encourage your athlete to be his or her best ally. Subconscious visualization is always happening, whether we realize it out not. Self-doubt and negative thoughts are always lurking in the background, waiting for a moment to take over. Visualizing success can help keep thoughts focused in a positive direction. Visualization can also help with organization and anxiety, two areas that can be confidence killers for anyone.

Building self-esteem through sports is an important part of your child’s development and can affect them in many other areas of life, even into adulthood. Your athlete’s ability to perform at their best in school, with their team and even in everyday chores or tasks is tied to their self-worth. Adults with good confidence levels tend to have less depression and are more aware of their physical wellness needs.

There are many more ways we can work with our youth to build their confidence. We hope to cover as many confidence builders as we can in our blogs. We invite you and your young athlete to train with us at Competitive Edge where we design our classes, clinics and summer camps to build self-worth and respect every day.

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